Posts tagged Halloween

Halloween Top Favorites!

To round out our Halloween blogging session, we thought that some lists discussing some Halloween favorites would be perfect. It is obvious, that we love to dress up in costume on this holiday. Our first list compiles what we believe will be some of the most popular Halloween costumes this year, for both adults and children! After much research, we have compiled these lists:

Top 10 Adult Costumes

1. The Royal Couple (Prince William and Kate Middleton)

2. Green Lantern

3. Angry Birds (this game is a global epidemic!)

4. iPhones/Steve Jobs/Anything Apple

5. Lady Gaga

6. Jersey Shore Characters

7. Captain America

8. Foot Loose Characters (the remake of this classic is in theaters now!)

9. Flight Attendant (thank you, Pan Am)

10. Charlie Sheen

Top 10 Children’s Costumes

1. Captain America

2. Twister

3. Monster High Characters

4. Transformer’s “Bumblebee” Costume

5. Wolverine

6. Smurfs

7. Disney Princess Characters

8. Harry Potter Characters

9. iPod

10. Any other Superhero

**There were many more that are not listed, but it’s our guess that these will be some of the most popular!**

Stikii shoes and accessories will go GREAT with costumes next year. It will be so easy to match shoe color to the color of the child’s costume. Also, Stik’em accessories can be purchased to go along with the theme of the costumer. Crown Stik-ems would go great with a princess costume, and a guitar Light-up Stik-em would be the perfect match for an iPod costume. Be sure to keep this in mind next year when preparing costumes for your little ones!

We cannot wait to pass out candy to all of these decked out trick-or-treaters this year! Speaking of trick-or-treat, what candies are the most popular to toss into goodie bags each year? We are pretty sure they do not change much over the years. Check out this list of the most classic and popular Halloween candies (in no particular order):

Popular Halloween Candy for Trick-or-Treaters

  1. Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups
  2. Snicker’s
  3. M&Ms
  4. Pop Rocks (flashback to the 70s?)
  5. Kit Kat Bars (so much candy is given out on Halloween that children don’t even have to worry about breaking of a piece to share!)
  6. Sour Patch Kids
  7. Laffy Taffy (be sure to check out the jokes on the wrappers!)
  8. Hershey’s Milk Chocolate
  9. Nerds
  10. Halloween Themed Candy (gum eyeballs, chocolate skeletons, orange and black taffy)
  11. Tootsie Rolls
  12. Candy Corn
  13. Twix
  14. Starbursts
  15. Butterfinger
  16. Candy Corn
  17. Nestlé’s Crunch
  18. Bubble Gum
  19. Blow Pops & Caramel Apple Suckers
  20. Baby Ruth’s

Did you see some of your favorites on this list? We are hoping that by 2012-13 we can get Stik-em’s on that list. These accessories would be a great for treat bags, especially for smaller Halloween parties. They are a practical and healthy alternative to the usual candy passed out!

Feel free to comment and let us know if we are missing anything on these lists and we will be happy to add your suggestions. Don’t forget to visit our Facebook Page and “Like” us www.facebook.com/stikiishoes. We hope that you enjoyed our Halloween themed blog series! Stikii wishes everyone a safe and Happy Halloween!

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Halloween Safety Tips

At Stikii, the safety of our customers and children alike is extremely important, which is why we chose to dedicate this blog to Halloween Safety Tips. Everyone knows that Halloween is meant to be a time for treats and spooky fun. No child should have to experience an actual “scary” Halloween in which they are found to be in danger or injured. Parents should ensure that all proper precautions are taken during this ghostly holiday in order to provide the child with a memorable and fun experience!

Parents can help keep children safe and prevent them from harm by following the following safety tips from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Safety Council and the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Rules and Tips for Children:

  • Approach only well-lit houses and remain on the front porch. NEVER enter a house, especially without adult supervision.
  • Travel in small groups while accompanied by a responsible adult.
  • When using costume weapons, ensure that they are not dangerous. Swords and knifes should be flexible, not rigid or sharp. Toy guns should be colorful so that they are not presumed to be real, and if “loaded” should contain soft ammunition such as a Nerf ball or dart.
  • Use flashlights, stay on sidewalks, avoid crossing yards, cross streets at the corner, use crosswalks and do not cross between parked cars. Be sure the child understands the importance of “stop, look and listen”.
  • Allow children to carry a cellphone. Ensure that they are aware of how to reach parents as well as to call 911 in an emergency situation.
  • Pin a tag to the child’s costume that states their full name and phone number if the child is too young to remember them.
  • Do not allow children to eat the treats they collect until they have been inspected by an adult. Ensure that candy has not been tampered with, unwrapped or spoiled prior to eating. Local fire stations and police stations often offer free candy inspections during the Halloween holiday.
  • Consider using face paint instead of masks so as to not obstruct the child’s vision.
  • Avoid wearing long, baggy or loose costumes and oversized shoes to help prevent tripping.

                                              Tips for Parents and Adults:

  • Supervise trick-or-treating and other Halloween activities for children under the age of 12.
  • Establish a curfew for older children.
  • Be sure to leave the porch light on and clear the way for incoming trick-or-treaters.
  • Avoid handing out choking hazards such as gum, peanuts, hard candies or small toys as treats to young children.
  • Have the child eat dinner prior to trick-or-treating to help ensure that they do not over-indulge in candy after.
  • Ration treats.
  • Inspect all candy for safety.
  • Drive slowly, exit driveways and alleyways carefully.
  • Have children exit vehicles on the curb side rather than traffic side.
  • If putting on your own Haunted House production, be sure to only allow entrance to older children and to avoid using dangerous props.

                                                  Jack O’lantern Tips

  • Adult supervision at all times for children and teens.
  • Carve pumpkins on stable, flat surfaces with good lighting.
  • Have the child draw the face on the pumpkin with a permanent marker and let the parent/adult do the carving to avoid injury.
  • Place lighted pumpkins away from curtains and other flammable objects and do not leave lighted for an extended period of time
  • Paint pumpkins rather than carve them!
  • We suggest that rather than using tea candles, to use battery-operated candles that can be found in the Halloween section of local drug stores. 
  • Do not allow children to handle sharp objects and tools.
  • Keep very small children away from the carving, especially the pumpkin seeds which can be a choking hazard.

Although Halloween is a fun time of year for kids, it is no fun to get hurt, so take some time to make sure your kids have a safe, healthy, and fun Halloween.  For Halloween 2012, we suggest you invest in a pair of Stikii shoes for your child. They are extremely comfortable and will help to avoid painful blisters after many blocks of trick-or-treating. We also suggest purchasing various light-up Stik-em’s for the child to attach to their shoes prior to treat collecting.

 The lights on the Stik-em’s will keep the child visible and help to avoid injury by increasing the light near their feet. For more information on Stikii shoes and our fabulous Stik-em accessories, become a fan on Facebook, www.facebook.com/stikiishoes.  Have a happy and safe Halloween!

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Making History: Halloween

Halloween may go down in the books as one of your child’s favorite holidays of the year. Surveys show that children love the spooky holiday nearly as much as they love Christmas! At Stikii, what is important to children is important to us as well. Thus, we begin our Halloween Blog session. Over the next few weeks we will share with you some thoughts and information on this very special fall holiday.

Halloween is celebrated on the last day of October (October 31) and traditional activities include trick-or-treating, costume parties, ghost stories, haunted houses and carving jack-o-lanterns.  The holiday is celebrated in countries such as the US, Scotland, Ireland, Canada, Puerto Rico, the UK, Australia and New Zealand.

Though the United States is known for its Halloween celebrations, the holiday actually originates from the ancient Celtic festival known as Samhain. This festival celebrates the end of the harvest season in Gaelic culture. On this day, the ancient pagans would take stock of supplies and prepare for the treacherous winter months. The Gaels also believed that on October 31st, the window between the worlds of the living and the dead would open and the deceased could come back to life and reap havoc on the locals by creating mass illness or damaging crops.

Samhain was considered to be a magical holiday on which strange and enchanting things would occur. It has been said that offerings of food and drink were left to aid unleashed spirits, or to ward them away. Others tell tales of the Celts dressing up in peculiar costumes and roaming the neighborhoods in order to scare the spirits away.  On this day many thought they could predict the future or even communicate with the dead, and often enough, unusual behavior was observed by a normally structured and quiet civilization.

Sacred bonfires were lit in the center of town in honor of the Pagan gods and the Celts would gather (some in costumer as well) to celebrate the harvest and discuss the upcoming months. Faeries (known to us as fairies) were believed to roam the land during Samhain, dressed as beggars asking for food door to door. Those that gave food to the faeries were rewarded, while those that did not were punished by the faeries. It is from this ritual that modern day “trick or treating” originated.

In the First century A.D., as Christianity spread across the globe, the Pagan festival (Christians did not like a festival with Pagan roots) was replaced with “All Saints Day” to honor dead church saints and martyrs. However, Samhain continued to be celebrated and eventually, All Saints day was moved to November 1, and was also known as All Hallows. Since Samhain remained on October 31st it became to be known as All Hallows Eve, and now, as Halloween.  November 2nd was designated as All Souls day to hour the dead who were not saints, but now the two are celebrated as one.

Over the next several centuries, superstitions about witches and black cats were added to the folklore and legends of Halloween. Cats were thought of as evil, especially black cats, and were killed by the thousands in Medieval times, possibly contributing to the Black Plague, due to the shortage of the rat’s natural enemy, the cat. During this time, the church created the belief that evil witches existed. Jack-o-lanterns can be traced back to early Pagan Celtic peoples who would hollow out turnips, gourds, or rutabagas to hold an ember from the sacred bonfire, so they could light their home fires from the sacred bonfire. We now carve faces and other shapes into pumpkins.

Halloween was not a popular observance in early United States history, as most of the early settlers were Protestant. At the time, Halloween was considered mostly a Catholic, Episcopalian, and Pagan holiday. Colonies such as Virginia and Maryland, observed some Halloween customs. The first common events included “play parties” where neighborhoods would gather together to celebrate the harvest, dance, sing, tell stories of the dead, tell fortunes, and have pageants for children in costume.

By the mid twentieth century, Halloween turned into a secular holiday, community centered with parties city-wide, parades, and great costumes. Halloween is mostly aimed to children, but young and old enjoy this holiday, with events and parties for both children and adults.

Some modern day Halloween traditions include:

  • Trick or Treat
  • Costumes
  • Bonfires
  • Bobbing for apples
  • Jack o’lanterns
  • Ghost stories
  • Haunted houses
  • Scary movies
  • Hay rides
  • Corn mazes

Stikii recognizes Halloween as a fun time for children to dress up and be carefree. The holiday is memorable and enjoyable, just like our shoes. In the future, Stikii may even release some Halloween themed Stik-ems that would be perfect on costumed feet!  Stik-em accessories would also make for a great alternative to Hallowwen candy. When trick or treaters come knocking on your door, hand them a Stik-em and we asure you that the costumed cuties will leave with a smile on their face! For more information on Stikii shoes and Stik-em accessories, become a fan on Facebook. Visit us at www.facebook.com/stikiishoes. Our products are set to release on December 1, 2011.

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